Posts

Recovery Community Giving Back to Life Saving Hospital Ward

TBRP staff, past and present clients, members of our recovery communities and friends and relatives are all getting behind an event to help raise vital funds for Ward 17 at Huddersfield Royal Infirmary.  We hope you will too!

Rallying the recovery communities of Calderdale in Recovery and Kirklees in Recovery is Fiona Whitehead who, at one point, was given just hours to live. Fiona considers herself lucky and due to the professionalism and quick thinking of the staff at Ward 17, she is still here and able to say thanks by helping in their campaign.  Ward 17 are trying to raise a massive £20,000 for vital life equipment.

See how you can help …

Overgate Colour Run

Last year I wasn’t confident enough to do the colour run but went and watched everyone having a great time.

Seeing it made me realise you didn’t have to be a great runner, just up for a laugh.

Soooo…… I signed up for it this year and was so glad that I did as it was fab.

There were even more people running, jogging or walking this time. 30+ of us from recovery alone, including the Huddersfield Ladies (KiR) (sending them big hugs and sure we’ll up to something again soon).

From meeting up to looking like we’d been in a paint factory explosion and departing, there were laughs and, of course, the usual banter.

Not forgetting, of course, what we were doing it for, such a wonderful cause ‘Overgate Hospice

I’m hoping I’ll be around and free for next years shenanigans

Thank you, Calderdale in Recovery

Gina

And the winner is …

In the summer I had the pleasure of attending an open day for the Basement Project. It was a day to support and raise funds for the amazing work that these guys are doing – opening new doors for people trying to overcome alcohol and substance abuse. I could not believe my luck when I was told I had won tickets to see the XFactor semi-finals live in London! Having watched it religiously on TV for years, it was just a phenomenal experience to be there and witness it all first hand. Thanks to our ‘VIP status’ for the night, we were escorted to the backstage bar where we brushed shoulders with some of the stars but meeting the man behind the voiceover was definitely the highlight. The show itself was simply fantastic, from the first class seats with a perfect view of Mr. Cowell to the impressive lighting and sound and watching the brilliant cameramen working their magic. After the show, we returned to the bar where we took more photos including some with the contestants. Perfect end to a perfect evening. Thanks so much again to the Basement Project for this fantastic opportunity and keep up the great work guys!!

Have a great Christmas and New Year and many thanks once again.

Joy

A night under the stars

under the stars, homeless halifaxI’d like to share with you all a brief story of our night sleeping outdoors to raise awareness and much needed funds for the rising homeless in Halifax.

Although the title may suggest a romantic story, other than a good sense of unity support and a few laughs, for me, it was quite the opposite. It was an eye-opening stark reminder of what might have been if I had continued on the road I was travelling.

 

under the stars with Calderdale SmartMoveMy son Luke and I arrived at the Shay Stadium at approx. 8:10pm. We were one of the first people to arrive, so we promptly found a bed for the night. We sat down on the shockingly cold concrete steps and were soon joined by our fellow campers; Kev, Fiona and their son Harrison (who is the same age as Luke, so they had some likeminded company other than myself – though I’m told I often act like a 12 year old). Paul and Gerald joined us soon after.

We settled in for the night, having great banter and some quite deep discussions … regarding addiction, would you believe?

The temperature was clearly dropping and after some sleeping bag malfunctions, we were witness to a speech from a SmartMove employee whose name escapes me, about just why we were all there and where the money goes and the difference we can make in people’s lives by simply attending events like this.

Quite a few people turned up although the numbers dwindled in the early hours. TBRP stood strong and finished the job. A lot of people couldn’t sleep and stayed up all night listening to music played by a talented gentleman and his guitar. Our very own Fiona couldn’t sleep because of the sounds of our snoring echoing around the stadium.

Calderdale SmartMove night under the stars

We left at 6:30am after breakfast was offered. On arriving home, I went straight to bed and tried getting some heat into my frozen aching body. Our night was just a small insight into the harsh reality of homelessness. We were dripped on, frozen, had aching bodies and had intermittent sleep in the space of 9 hours. We were glad to get home!

I cannot imagine having to do this every day, all day, not knowing where I will sleep or what I would eat, invisible to passers-by, being isolated, yet surrounded by others going about their daily routines.

night under the stars at shay stadium with smartmove

I really hope our small donation of our time and your sponsorship makes a difference in someone’s life. Thanks to Luke, Fiona, Kev, Harrison, Jed and Paul for a great night and an experience I won’t forget. You can continue to donate to SmartMove via their Localgiving page.

Same time next year?

Martin

Alcoholism affects the whole family – and so does recovery!

The Basement Recovery Project is and has been an invaluable source of friendship and support not just for my partner as he found his feet in recovery but for the whole family throughout and beyond.

Recovering addicts to cycle 170 miles coast to coast

On Friday 15th September 2017, 14 members of the local recovery community will be coming together to cycle 170 miles from Morecambe to Bridlington over the course of four days. Those taking part have been training for a number of months; prior to which they had little or no experience of cycling any significant distance…

Brave young woman skydives in alcoholic father’s memory to support addiction recovery project

“I’ll always be proud of him”, says young woman who skydived in father’s memory.

Abi Mae Haley’s father sadly passed away in 2014, shortly before her 15th birthday.  He had struggled with alcohol addiction.  Unfortunately, though he had started to turn his life around, the illness had already taken its toll.  Abi recently completed a sponsored skydive to raise funds and awareness of addiction and where to get help.

“Kirklees in Recovery worked with my dad to plan the best road to recovery. I honestly saw a change in him in such a short period of time, a change so good that he started to plan for his future again.  Maybe, just maybe, if he had found this place of support sooner, things would be different.

Before Dad passed away I was sent a video of him training to do a sky dive.  I looked at this frequently and I could see that he was, at last, doing something that made him happy.  That’s where I got the idea to raise awareness of the place that helped him, and to finish something that he started.

I take my hat off to the people working at Kirklees in Recovery as I know first-hand some of the difficulties they must face every day, but I also know how amazing it is to see the small improvements in the people they work with”.

On Father’s Day, Sunday 18th June, Abi Mae completed the skydive her dad had been training for.  She set up a crowdfunding page and reached her £500 target.

“I was terrified at the thought of doing a skydive, but like many of those who suffer from addiction, I faced my fears and the result was amazing.  The money I donate to Kirklees in Recovery will go towards making a difference to the lives of those who they help; from providing the smallest of things like a cup of tea and a friendly chat to helping to support their recovery programmes which can be the difference between recovery and relapse.  Helping Kirklees in Recovery can also help to provide extra services in more rural communities, reaching out to those who are most isolated in our local areas.

I never thought I would lose my dad as soon as I did, but I will always be so proud of the man he was and I hope that I am making him proud now by inheriting his strong and positive outlook in life, and by making the most of what I have now.  I chose to donate to Kirklees in Recovery because even the smallest amount of money could make a difference to someone’s life, as well as their families and friends”.

September is National Recovery Month and Kirklees in Recovery started celebrating by walking from their Dewsbury recovery hub to the Huddersfield hub on 1st September where Abi presented a cheque for £717.

Event organiser, Sheena West, said,

“Recovery Month is to raise awareness of addiction, to help reduce the stigma surrounding it and to let people know there is help.  Everyone knows someone who knows someone affected by addiction, yet we all try to ignore it because we don’t know how to help.  Addiction to drugs and alcohol is a serious illness and many people have no idea that you can recover and lead a better life, free from the need or desire to use any mood-altering substance.

We have been amazed at Abi Mae’s fundraising.  She has shown a strong and positive attitude at such a difficult time in her life and she is an inspiration to all of us. She has truly done a wonderful thing and I know her dad would be very proud indeed. Her generosity will directly help those with addiction issues. She is always welcome at our project and we wish her every success in her future”.

With thanks and much love from us all at KiR x

Abi’s story was also covered in The Huddersfield Daily Examiner

Tough Mudder 2017 with CiR

calderdale in recovery - tough mudder participantsI had heard of Tough Mudder before, but I can’t say it is something I would have given much thought to in the past. To be perfectly honest, in the past, I was far too consumed by paranoia and self-pity to even consider the idea that Tough Mudder was something I could complete or that it was something that I would actually enjoy doing! When I was still actively using drugs and had not yet found recovery, there was absolutely no chance that it was something I would have done.

Tough Mudder is a brilliant team building event. It is exhilarating and fun. It tests your physical and mental abilities. It is about twelve miles long with about twenty obstacles along the way. Some of the obstacles included electrocution, others jumping into ice cold water and then there were the ones where you had to climb and have the strength to get over them – as well as helping others to get around the course!

I was actually pretty excited when I was asked if I wanted to take part with eleven others from Calderdale in Recovery. Through taking part in few activities since coming into recovery I am (slowly but surely!) learning to overcome any anxieties that I may have around them and just get involved! I am yet to regret it and usually end up really enjoying myself!

The whole day was funny from the minute we got on the mini bus. Jo doing her usual live feeds and Chris putting his heart in soul into singing along to a Vanessa May song!

There are quite a few moments that stood out. It was nice that I was able to help some of the others get around some of the obstacles and it was lovely how grateful they were for my help. There were also moments when I needed help myself – and I was surrounded by fantastic people to support me, all of whom just wanted to make sure that we all made it round. I felt part of a great team; it was a real bonding experience.

At one point, we reached a section called ‘mud mile’ – where you had to clamber over big mounds of mud and through water. They were blasting out ‘Gangham Style’ through the speakers. I turned around to see Jo and Sam dancing away (whilst all the other people around us were looking pretty serious and drained at this point). Next Kev started dancing and I couldn’t help but join in. Every time we got to the top of one the mounds we stopped and danced. I think everyone else thought we were mad – but it was a right laugh. Looking back at the video of this makes me smile and it’ll definitely be a happy memory that stays with me!

I also had loads of fun play fighting in the mud with Jay and Sy. They might take any opportunity to take the mickey – which is usually funny – but I knew that if I needed support at any point doing the obstacles they would be there to help me if they could.

At the end of the day and even still now looking back on it I feel quite proud of myself. I was absolutely shattered at the end of it – but in a good way, like I had achieved something!

If anyone was thinking about getting involved with any of the Calderdale in Recovery activities but were unsure I would encourage them to do it;

Don’t hesitate – life is for living innit!

Luke.

 

LIKE the CiR Facebook Page for more information on CiR and JOIN the group for updates, news, help and advice.

 

Fundraising for a Town Centre Defibrillator

Calderdale in Recovery meet with Holly Lynch MP to discuss fundraising for a new defibrillator for Halifax

Calderdale in Recovery meet with Holly Lynch MP to discuss fundraising for a new defibrillator for Halifax

Within the past week or so we have started promoting a new project within Calderdale in Recovery. The hope is that we will raise enough funds to purchase a defibrillator that will be accessible in Halifax Town Centre 24 hours a day. If someone suffers a heart attack then quick access to this equipment can literally mean life or death.

I’m told that, currently, there are at least 6 accessible defibs in Sowerby Bridge and three in Todmorden (purchased through some impressive fundraising in those local communities) so I find it shocking that we do not have one in Halifax town centre that can be accessed by anyone who needs it at any time of day.

Many of the members of Calderdale in Recovery feel compelled to give something back to our community – something that we already do by supporting local projects such as Incredible Edible and Slow the Flow project. Many people who have seen their lives consumed by drug addiction and alcoholism appreciate the assistance, support and kindness that has helped them to come out the other side. It is also no secret that when in the grip of this horrible illness, individuals can have somewhat negative effects on those closest to them and the wider community – so once abstinent many are keen to give something back and make amends.

We have a few ideas up our sleeves for fundraising and raising awareness and we would really appreciate any donation through the JustGiving page – you never know, it maybe you or a loved one that benefits from a defibrillator in the future!

This week we met with Holly Lynch MP who was thrilled to hear about this project and the work of Calderdale in Recovery – she also gave us some good ideas for how to reach our goals.

If anyone wants to get involved or support this project in any way then they should definitely speak to a Calderdale in Recovery Builder via their Facebook Page! Let’s do this!

Donate

Donate via the JustGiving Page

Coast to Coast Walk by The Basement Recovery Project

 

TBRP Coast to Coast Walk

Day One

(190 miles to go)

Eight hardy souls set off from Halifax on 17th June with the aim of walking from the West Coast (Irish Sea) to the East Coast (North Sea). What were we thinking?

The journey to our starting point, St Bees in Cumbria, was uneventful apart from finding the only petrol station in England with antique pumps. It would have taken less time to fill up if we had drilled for our own crude oil and refined it. Nevertheless we arrived at our destination for about 11ish, dipped our toes in the sea, picked up our pebbles and did one. It is a custom for coast to coast walkers to take a pebble from one coast and throw it in the sea when they arrive at the other.

Read more