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Welcome to The Kindness Hub – Todmorden

The Basement Recovery Project is pleased to announce the opening of our new hub in Todmorden – The Kindness Hub

The hub will officially open its doors for public viewing on March 6th 2020 between 1pm and 3pm. You are welcome to come along.

 

The Wellness Hub Todmorden Invitation

 

Todmorden Kindness Hub

Kindness: Believe there is good in the world

In the wet hills of Yorkshire, the community of Todmorden is at the forefront of a movement that is picking up momentum across a UK disillusioned with corporate business, government and cuts. It is neither hippy nor New Age but is made up of ordinary people, old and young, from both affluent homes and social housing. Call it a sharing revolution. Talk about community empowerment, social enterprise, co-operatives (it has various titles) but this asset-based approach leads to local members taking over the infrastructure of their community.

Having supported the development of the recovery community in Todmorden over the last few years we believe the next strategic step is to sustain a ‘grassroots’ hub offering vital and meaningful services anchored in the heart of the community. Our Kindness hub is a revolutionary venue that’s so much more than your usual community space. We hope to provide a truly welcoming, creative and intelligent space where people from all backgrounds and walks of life can potentially dine, hang out, socialise and relax.

Primarily we have a venue for our community cafe right in the heart of the Town centre that allows local people who are energetic, driven, optimistic, and aspirationally based to have a focal point for their activities. Our aim is to make a contribution to the local community based on the principles of caring and communitarianism. We will encourage participation in community life and ‘giving something back’ by making a commitment to community involvement and engagement.

Our space will be a welcoming, creative hub where people from all backgrounds and walks of life can meet, socialise and relax. The hub has a wider potential to offer a range of opportunities for people to support each other and develop, personally and socially. As well as hosting our therapeutic programmes we hope to build on our existing partnerships with local businesses, incredible edible, community arts providers and work closely with local artists, musicians, poets and performers to offer a wide range of entertaining, educational and inspirational social events. There will be an opportunity to develop social enterprise activity, giving people in the locality the opportunity to gain skills and experience, as well as access training and qualifications.

The project will create the opportunity for both the statutory partners and the recovery community to share space and offer a greater level of visibility with more flexible opening hours. Significantly, we will provide more dignity and discretion for those we support, allowing them to reconnect and in doing so hope to provide a sense of ownership in the building for the community we support.

Women’s Recovery Retreat

“We spent two wonderful days just outside Settle at Hortons Women’s Retreat in the first weekend in June. To be honest, the thought of 15 of us all together came with a slight nervousness as to how we would last an entire weekend. Not everyone knew each other from across the TBRP hubs so it was a great way to connect and do some bonding, especially as we were sleeping in bunk beds, cooking, and generally supporting one another.”

Calderdale Recovery Steps

IT’S ALL CHANGE IN CALDERDALE WITH A NEW ADULT DRUG AND ALCOHOL SERVICE RECOVERY STEPS AND WE INTERVIEW THOSE INVOLVED…

On 2nd February 2015 a new service started delivering adult drug and alcohol services in Calderdale. A new partnership between DISC, St. Martin’s Health Care and The Basement Recovery Project replaces the Calderdale Substance Misuse Service (CSMS).

We talk to the partner organisations, but firstly, we managed to catch up with

Niamh Cullen from Calderdale Council and Commissioner for services:

Rolling out Mutual Aid

My first experience of asking for help was to visit my doctor in Bradford. All she wanted to do was quiz me about the fact I stunk of booze and had driven there. I left feeling threatened, rejected and misunderstood. I remember her saying, “As a doctor I have a duty of care to my community…” and the implied words “I should therefore shop you to the police the minute you leave the surgery”. I left and drank for another three years, in which time I lost my job, my marriage, my home and all self-respect – I just wanted to die.

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